OpenPGP Key Recreation and Revocation

Despites nearly having forgotten to blog about it, time has come to get myself a stronger OpenPGP keypair. But what about the folks I already established a secure connection with using the old key 0x800e21f5 and what about the rest of the internet? It’s not as complic as one might think.

1. Key Creation

Key creation is very simple if you use GnuPG on Linux:

0x220b:~$ gpg --gen-key

You can leave the default options (RSA/RSA,  4096bit, never expires) until it comes to name, e-mail and comment, where you should fill in your personal data associated w/ the use of the key. In most cases, one e-mail address is not enough, but you can just add one like this:

0x220b:~$ gpg --edit-key 6C71D217
gpg> showpref
[uneingeschränkt] (1). Peter Ohm (NetworkSEC/NWSEC) <p.ohm@networksec.de>
 Verschlü.: AES256, AES192, AES, CAST5, 3DES
 Digest: SHA256, SHA1, SHA384, SHA512, SHA224
 Komprimierung: ZLIB, BZIP2, ZIP, nicht komprimiert
 Eigenschaften: MDC, Keyserver no-modify
gpg> adduid

Now enter the other e-mail addy and a relevant comment if you wish. So, we now got a fresh key – but what about the old one(s)? At first, we should use them to sign the new one:

0x220b:~$ gpg --default-key 800e21f5 --sign-key 6C71D217
0x220b:~$ gpg --default-key 7BB7A759 --sign-key 6C71D217

and then finally give everybody access to our new public key by:

0x220b:~$ gpg --keyserver pgp.mit.edu --send-key 6C71D217

2. Key Revocation

Okay, now everybody must be able to know that the old keys are not used any longer. This can easily be achieved by first creating a revocation certificate for each of them, then importing that into the own keyring and finally exporting the revoked keys to the internet. Lets do it w/ a small shell skript and gpg2:

#!/bin/bash
for i in 7bb7a759 800e21f5
do
 gpg2 --output revoke.asc --gen-revoke $i
 gpg2 --import revoke.asc 
 gpg2 --keyserver pgp.mit.edu --send-keys $i
done

3. More Key Distribution

I also recommend to send everybody you already set up an encrypted communications channel with your new public key as they will be the only ones possibly using the old key material (most OpenPGP clients refuse to use revoked keys for encryption) and as it’s especially them who would need to be informed about any changes.

So, even if anybody interested in establishing a secure communications channel did not yet get your new public key, all that remains to be done is:

gpg --keyserver pgp.mit.edu --recv-keys 6C71D217
gpg --keyserver pgp.mit.edu --refresh-keys

…and don’t forget to attach your own public key if its a first-time contact.

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